KOSHA MANGSHO

KOSHA MANGSHO

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When any Bong will hear the name of Kosha Mangsho, they will go weak in their knees, as this tempting dish is near to any Bengalis heart. The caramelised sticky masala, tangy and spicy, clinging to the soft succulent pieces of mutton is to die for and if accompanied with some luchis (Puris) then one is in food heaven. I prefer it with puris, but many prefer it with rotis or parathas or even steamed rice.

This is a semi dry gravy dish traditionally slow cooked for hours together with almost no water added, as the meat get cooked in its own juices with masalas to get the perfect results. This dish requires lots of patience and love for whom you are cooking it for, that special ingredient love is what brings out the true flavours in this dish.

This is my Baba’s (Fathers) favourite mutton dish and he used to get the kid goat’s meat for this particular dish as it is tender and can be cooked to soft and juicy perfection. I still remember whenever we used to go on a picnic or a long drive, at those days we didn’t used to prefer roadside food and neither we had fast food joints as we have now. I personally think that the children of today are spoiled by choices of food available outside and they don’t want to try the awesome homemade food which we are grown up enjoying those days. During such trips we used to take Kosha Mangsho and Luchi or Paratha, or else Shami Kabab and Parathas, along with some onion and lemon salad and that was just heavenly, believe me sitting on a river bed, under a tree or in a park or anywhere near nature in open air we used to spread our mat and enjoy these kinds of soul food with so much love as the whole family was together and along with the chitty chatty, antakshari games or a simple game of cards. We all used to bond so much with love, that I feel is missing in today’s life hope will recreate that moment once in a while for my family too.

You all do try this recipe and go out for a nature trip once in a while and get a rejuvenating freshness in your life. Belive me once you go for such trips you will have extra enthusiasm and energy to perform better in your life. Till then enjoy. Happy cooking!

koshamangsho-2_1RECIPE FOR KOSHA MANGSHO:

Ingredients:

  • 1 kg – Boneless mutton (Preferably of a kid goat)
  • 2 large – Onions finely chopped
  • 1 big – Onion grated
  • 2 tbsp – Ginger garlic paste
  • 1 cup –  Fresh tomato puree
  • 1/4 th tsp – Sugar for caramelising
  • 1/2 cup –  Mustard oil (originally this recipe is made in mustard oil but you can make it with normal oil, but  can’t guarantee you the same taste as we get in mustard oil)
  • Salt to taste

Whole spices for tempering:

  • 5 to 6 – Whole red chillies dried
  • 1 tsp – Whole peppercorn
  • 3 to 4 – Green cardamom
  • 1 to 2 – Black cardamom
  • 3 to 4 – Cloves
  • 1 stick – Cinnamon
  • 2 nos – Bay leaf

Dry masalas :

  • 1 tbsp – Coriander powder
  • 1 tsp – Cumin powder
  • 1/2 tsp – Turmeric powder
  • 1 tbsp – Red chilli powder
  • 1 tsp – Garam masala powder

Marination for the mutton:

  • 2 tbsp – Grated raw papaya or paste
  • 1/2 cup – Curd
  • 1 tbsp – Green chilli paste
  • 1 tsp – Kashmiri red chilli powder
  • 1 tsp – Raw mustard oil (optional)
  • Salt a bit

Method:

  1. First of all, marinate the mutton chunks with the marination ingredients and marinate for 3 to 4 hours preferably. The raw papaya in the marinate will help in tenderising the mutton and making it soft and succulent.
  2. Now heat a thick bottom pan or kadhai and heat the mustard oil till smoking point and switch off the flame (smoking the mustard oil helps in removing the pungent smell of the oil and leaves a nutty note to the oil when the gravy is cooked so don’t be afraid trying this oil as it won’t smell of mustard when smoked to right point)
  3. Switch on the flame after few seconds add the whole spices for tempering and some 1/2 to 1/4 th tsp sugar as you like and cook till the spices crackle and the sugar caramelises as this caramel of sugar will give a nice colour to the whole dish.
  4. Add finely chopped onions, some chopped green chillies if you wish and fry the onions till they are golden brown.
  5. Add the grated onion and fry, now add ginger garlic paste and all the dry masalas I personally soak all the dry masalas with the ginger garlic paste for 10 minutes with little bit of water so that while frying the masala the dry masalas doesn’t burn and spoil the flavour of the dish), keep frying the masalas till the oil separates and the raw smell of all masalas are gone keep stirring on intervals do not let the masalas burn, keep cooking on from medium to low flame.
  6. Once the masalas are fried add the tomato puree fry till the tomato puree thickens and the oil separates from the masala, at this point add the pre-marinated mutton and add salt to taste, fry on high flame till the mutton pieces are sealed then lower the flame and cover the dish with a heavy tight fitting lid.
  7. Cook on low flame stirring and checking at intervals till the mutton is soft and tender and the caramelised masala is just clinging to the mutton.
  8. If at any point, you think that the masala is sticking to the bottom scrape it and if it is burning just sprinkle some water, but remember that in traditional recipe no water is added to cook this dish as the beauty of this dish is that the mutton cooks in its own juices and adding water could spoil the taste of the dish. When done switch off the flame.
  9. Cooking this dish requires lots of patience and elbow grease and not to forget lots of love the main ingredients, which makes this dish so special.
  10. Serve hot with Luchis (Puris) as we bongs love to have with or with any Indian breads like parathas, rotis or nans.
  11. Serve with a slice of lemon and some fresh green chillies for that extra kick.
  12. As I love to have it spicy hot but you can reduce the chilli part according to your tolerance limit. Happy Cooking!

koshamangsho-1_1

 

NOTE:

  1. Cooking this particular dish in an iron kadhai will enhance the taste and health aspects more.
KOSHA MANGSHO
 
Author:
Recipe type: Main Course, Non-veg
Cuisine: Indian
Ingredients
  • 1 kg – Boneless mutton (Preferably of a kid goat)
  • 2 large – Onions finely chopped
  • 1 big – Onion grated
  • 2 tbsp – Ginger garlic paste
  • 1 cup – Fresh tomato puree
  • ¼ th tsp – Sugar for caramelising
  • ½ cup – Mustard oil (originally this recipe is made in mustard oil but you can make it with normal oil, but can’t guarantee you the same taste as we get in mustard oil)
  • Salt to taste
Whole spices for tempering:
  • 5 to 6 – Whole red chillies dried
  • 1 tsp – Whole peppercorn
  • 3 to 4 – Green cardamom
  • 1 to 2 – Black cardamom
  • 3 to 4 – Cloves
  • 1 stick – Cinnamon
  • 2 nos – Bay leaf
Dry masalas :
  • 1 tbsp – Coriander powder
  • 1 tsp – Cumin powder
  • ½ tsp – Turmeric powder
  • 1 tbsp – Red chilli powder
  • 1 tsp – Garam masala powder
Marination for the mutton:
  • 2 tbsp – Grated raw papaya or paste
  • ½ cup – Curd
  • 1 tbsp – Green chilli paste
  • 1 tsp – Kashmiri red chilli powder
  • 1 tsp – Raw mustard oil (optional)
  • Salt a bit
Instructions
  1. First of all, marinate the mutton chunks with the marination ingredients and marinate for 3 to 4 hours preferably. The raw papaya in the marinate will help in tenderising the mutton and making it soft and succulent.
  2. Now heat a thick bottom pan or kadhai and heat the mustard oil till smoking point and switch off the flame (smoking the mustard oil helps in removing the pungent smell of the oil and leaves a nutty note to the oil when the gravy is cooked so don’t be afraid trying this oil as it won’t smell of mustard when smoked to right point)
  3. Switch on the flame after few seconds add the whole spices for tempering and some ½ to ¼ th tsp sugar as you like and cook till the spices crackle and the sugar caramelises as this caramel of sugar will give a nice colour to the whole dish.
  4. Add finely chopped onions, some chopped green chillies if you wish and fry the onions till they are golden brown.
  5. Add the grated onion and fry, now add ginger garlic paste and all the dry masalas I personally soak all the dry masalas with the ginger garlic paste for 10 minutes with little bit of water so that while frying the masala the dry masalas doesn’t burn and spoil the flavour of the dish), keep frying the masalas till the oil separates and the raw smell of all masalas are gone keep stirring on intervals do not let the masalas burn, keep cooking on from medium to low flame.
  6. Once the masalas are fried add the tomato puree fry till the tomato puree thickens and the oil separates from the masala, at this point add the pre-marinated mutton and add salt to taste, fry on high flame till the mutton pieces are sealed then lower the flame and cover the dish with a heavy tight fitting lid.
  7. Cook on low flame stirring and checking at intervals till the mutton is soft and tender and the caramelised masala is just clinging to the mutton.
  8. If at any point, you think that the masala is sticking to the bottom scrape it and if it is burning just sprinkle some water, but remember that in traditional recipe no water is added to cook this dish as the beauty of this dish is that the mutton cooks in its own juices and adding water could spoil the taste of the dish. When done switch off the flame.
  9. Cooking this dish requires lots of patience and elbow grease and not to forget lots of love the main ingredients, which makes this dish so special.
  10. Serve hot with Luchis (Puris) as we bongs love to have with or with any Indian breads like parathas, rotis or nans.
  11. Serve with a slice of lemon and some fresh green chillies for that extra kick.
  12. As I love to have it spicy hot but you can reduce the chilli part according to your tolerance limit. Happy Cooking!
Notes
1. Cooking this particular dish in an iron kadhai will enhance the taste and health aspects more.
 

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